Basics #4: Fee-Fi-FOLD-Fum…

…if you don’t know how to fold, then you must be dumb.

Okay, maybe not. But even if you have no idea what “folding” in baking means, you’re just a few short minutes away from finding out. You’ll need a nice big bowl, a spatula, and whatever batter you’re supposed to fold.

Step 1: Start from the part of the bowl furthest away from you. Draw the spatula through the batter in a straight line towards yourself.

Step 2: Scrape the spatula along the sides of the bowl, pushing the batter away from you.

Step 3: Push whatever was underneath up onto the surface.

Step 4: Flip the spatula over.

And that was a fold! Then just repeat the steps. It should look something like this:

If you’re making muffins, most recipes will warn you not to over-mix the batter, otherwise your muffins will come out hard. That’s why you fold – this technique allows you to mix the dry ingredients with the wet without overworking the batter. A good sign that you’ve folded a muffin batter just right is that there will still be lumps.

Do not attempt to beat out the lumps! A lumpy batter makes the best muffins, so sayeth every baking guru on the planet. Just make sure there aren’t any huge pockets of dry ingredients left in the batter or you’ll have unpleasant nuggets of flour in your muffins!



2 thoughts on “Basics #4: Fee-Fi-FOLD-Fum…”

  • It depends on what the egg is used for in the recipe. If the egg is there purely to thicken (like in custards), you can easily replace it with cornstarch or other thickeners. If the egg adds moisture, you can try applesauce or mashed bananas. The most tricky is if the egg serves a leavening function (making things rise like in cakes). For that, I think the best way is to get a vegan egg replacement powder (like this one: http://www.ener-g.com/gluten-free/egg-substitute/egg-replacer.html) because they have chemical leavening agents added to it.
    Yes, you should be able to use buttermilk and milk interchangeably, but be aware buttermilk is more acidic than milk and that can have positive effects (makes cake more tender) and negative effects (makes dairy curdle).

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